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Professor Hendrik Ulbricht is Deputy Head of Department, Director of Research at the Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton and since October 2018 Head of the Quantum, Light & Matter (QLM) research devision at the same department.

Professor Hendrik Ulbricht is Professor of Physics. He obtained his undergraduate degree in physics (Dipl.-Phys.) from the Technical University at Berlin (Germany) and the Albert Einstein Institute (Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, Golm) in 2000 with a theoretical work on Black Hole Thermodynamics. He graduated with a PhD (Dr. rer. nat.) from the Free University of Berlin and the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society (Germany) in 2003 with a work on experimental surface science in the group of Nobel Laureate Gerhard Ertl (NP in Chemistry 2007). After a postdoc position at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, US on a Max Kade fellowship and as senior postdoc and Assistant Professor at the University of Vienna (Austria), he joined the Department of Physics & Astronomy in 2008 as a Reader and was promoted a personal chair in 2014. He leads the Quantum Nanophysics and Matterwave Interferometry research group. Ulbricht is the proud holder of the certification of apprenticeship as a bricklayer.

Research interests

Hendrik’s main research interests concern experimental tests of fundamental theories of Nature by table-top experiments but also in space. Some tests are concerned with the large mass limit of the quantum superposition principle, which forms the basis of quantum mechanics. Other experiments are concerned with testing the interplay between quantum mechanics and gravitation in the low energy limit.

The Ulbricht group performs quantum experimental research on the preparation and analysis of massive systems in non-classical states by various techniques. They pioneer so-called levitated opto- and magneto-mechanics experiments, where light and magnetic fields are used to both trap and control nano- and micro-particles in vacuum.

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